Believe it or not

By Creation Ministries International, CREATION.COM

The “missing links” are even more “missing” !

skulls
‘1470 man’ (L) closely matches ‘southern ape’.
Some scientists say ‘KNM-ER 1813’ (R) is Homo erectus (upright, smallish brain.. thus human?)
Photo: Conty, CC BY 3.0 license, Wikipedia Commons

When the greatly fragmented skull designated KNM-ER 1470 ('1470 man') was first discovered, it was paraded as a transitional 'ape-man', as Homo habilis.

But even many evolutionists now say the very notion of 'Homo habilis' should be abandoned. Even those who argue for its retention (as a convenient 'wastebin' for 'hominid' fossils they don't know what to do with?) concede its questionable status.

Homo habilis is now in even more trouble. Researchers led by Meave Leakey, reported in 2012 on newly discovered fossils from northern Kenya. A nearly complete lower jaw (KNM-ER 60000) and the well preserved face of a late juvenile (KNM-ER 62000) are said to match that of 1470.

These new fossils also closely match features of the juvenile male fossil (MH1) Australopithecus sediba. So if, as suggested by Leakey and the other researchers, '1470 man' belongs to whatever species these new finds belong to, then that makes 1470 also an Australopithecine. This means 'southern ape'—and no missing link, because it was less similar to both apes and humans than they are from each other. Therefore 1470 was not 'Homo habilis' or any other Homo (man). Without Homo habilis, there's no ape-to-man link.

This work confirms a trend that, as fossils are researched, the human-like ones become more human-like and the more ape-like ones become more ape-like, resulting in the 'missing links' becoming even more missing. The gap between apes and humans increases with more research, not decreases.

More details at creation.com/non-transitions and creation.com/early-homo.

? New fossils from Koobi Fora in northern Kenya confirm taxonomic diversity in early Homo, Nature 488:201-204, 9 August 2012.

? These new fossils are intriguing as hell, Lawn Chair Anthropology, 9 August 2012.

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